3D Printing Materials

Rubber-Like

At a glance

Process

Polyjet

Lead Time

24 hrs (rush)2 days (standard)

Colors

Black

Resolution

0.16 mm

Price

$$$

Applications

Simulating overmolds, soft-touch finishing, non-slip surfaces, watertight/ dust-proof seals

About the material

Rubber-Like is one of the unique printing capabilities of PolyJet machines because of the PhotoPolymer resin used in this style of printing. The prints will give you full flexibility of parts and allow you to simulate rubbers between Shore 27A and Shore 95A. This material, however, will not give you the same elastomeric properties you are used to in rubbers.

Rubber-Like is also great for testing overmolds, as the PolyJet machines can easily print one body in rubber and another in rubber without any seams.

Material Properties

Tensile Strength

0.8 MPa (115 PSI)

Elongation at Break

170%

Material Finish

The hardness of our rubber material can be easily configured to print in anything between Shore 27A and Shore 95A. The finish is smooth with a slight glossy surface. While the print is high resolution, the rubber material does tend to show off defects much easier, so expect some visible build lines.

Design Recommendations

Min Wall Thickness

1 mm min

Min Clearance + Gaps for Fit

0.2 mm offset on each wall is the recommended gap for enclosures.

Max Part Size (xyz)

610 x 813 x 813 mm
24 x 32 x 32 in

Tolerance

+/- 0.004” or +/- 0.001” per inch, whichever is greater

Internal Cavities

Internal cavities are highly discouraged with RubberLike due to the water-based support material that will swell and change the geometry overtime if left inside. Note that support material that has no direct line of sight inside a cavity cannot be cleaned out.

Text Guidelines

Text should be embossed by at least 1.0 mm to stay visible after printing. Text should also be at least 1.5 mm thick in all areas.

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