An Introduction to Solenoids
Written by
Dante Ros

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On
April 11, 2017
In
Engineering

Solenoids are coils of wire that, when electric current is applied, create a magnetic field that exerts a force over a metallic element. In our latest post on the Hardware Guide, we explain how they work.

solenoids

Solenoids help convert energy to action instantly and work well for applications that require immediate action. They are simple, inexpensive and pack a lot of power into a small form factor. Since their force is proportional to the position of their moving elements, they work best for short distances, making them ideal for valves, interlocks, electromechanical relays, etc. 

Solenoids' main applications include:

  • Electromechanical relays
  • Mechanical interlocks or operators
  • Pneumatic and hydraulic solenoid valves

Types of solenoids include:

  • Linear Solenoid (also known as tubular solenoids when encased in a metal protection), AC Laminated, DC C–Frame, and DC D–Frame
  • Rotary Solenoid

Solenoids are ideal for controlling valves and electromechanical switches or mechanical interlocks. Their simple operating principle and instantaneous response makes them effective for applications that need to pack a lot of power into small spaces, while being quick, consistent, and robust. Learn more in our latest post on the Hardware Guide.

Written by
Dante Ros
Mechatronics Engineer, avid & inveterate writer. 5+ years experience in industrial process control, instrumentation and automation.
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